Enums in Windows PowerShell Less Than Version 5.0

  • 0

Enums in Windows PowerShell Less Than Version 5.0

Line Break

Author: Frank Peter (97 Articles)

Maybe you’ve noticed that the upcoming version of Windows PowerShell, 5.0, will make Enumerators (Enums) very easy to create with the new enum keyword. With this post I share an approach to create enums in PowerShell 4.0 and lower as well.

(If you know what an Enumerator is you can skip this section.) Enums help you to deal with rather small ranges of integer values (each value gets a name) and, even more importantly, they simplify programming robust solutions. Put the case that you have to deal with different environments, for example Dev, Test, Acceptance, and Prod. And let’s say that each environment is represented by an int value (thus, 0 to 3 represents Dev to Prod). What happens if you assign the value 4 by mistake? For PowerShell it’s ok because 4 is a valid int value. Therefore, this error will remain undetected at the scene and – according Murphy – reveal its dark energy in the worst possible moment. You get the idea, I hope. It’s no fun to narrow down such problems. How to prevent such failure? You could mess around with if statements and -lt, -gt, -eq for example. Or you make use of, guess what, an Enum. If you have an Enum type for the afore-mentioned environments, PowerShell will refuse a variable of this type to be assigned any value outside of the scope 0..3 and throws an error at the root cause. Therefore, I like to use Enums ever since PowerShell 1.0.

In Windows PowerShell 4.0 and below, Enums are created as follows:

Now, play with it (that’s how I like to learn stuff, btw):

Now, let’s get dirty…

Btw, did you notice the hint within the error message? PowerShell lists the possible values for you.

Hope this helps


Leave a Reply

*